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I love the Thank You card. The importance of sending thank you cards was something my parents distilled in us as children. Our extended family lived halfway across the country, so presents were usually mailed. Mom and Dad sometimes (and literally) would force us to write these notes after Christmas and birthdays.
It’s a simple gesture, but oh, the impact. These days I rarely get them unless it’s after a wedding. But I send thank you cards often. I send after a lunch. Or after a highly successful meeting. For any business, really. 
My friend Kimberly Newport-Mimran, of Pink Tartan, knows the thank you card well. Her Yorkville boutique sells a variety of simple and sophisticated stationary, including Mrs. John L. Strong from New York. 
Mrs. John L. Strong has perfected the art of handcrafted stationary. Check out their various types of ready to write, bespoke and wedding stationary. And remember, pretty stationary deserves a pretty stamp, so choose wisely. How about the Queen?

I love the Thank You card. The importance of sending thank you cards was something my parents distilled in us as children. Our extended family lived halfway across the country, so presents were usually mailed. Mom and Dad sometimes (and literally) would force us to write these notes after Christmas and birthdays.

It’s a simple gesture, but oh, the impact. These days I rarely get them unless it’s after a wedding. But I send thank you cards often. I send after a lunch. Or after a highly successful meeting. For any business, really. 

My friend Kimberly Newport-Mimran, of Pink Tartan, knows the thank you card well. Her Yorkville boutique sells a variety of simple and sophisticated stationary, including Mrs. John L. Strong from New York. 

Mrs. John L. Strong has perfected the art of handcrafted stationary. Check out their various types of ready to write, bespoke and wedding stationary. And remember, pretty stationary deserves a pretty stamp, so choose wisely. How about the Queen?

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Lean In, Stand Tall

imageI’m reading Sheryl Sandberg’s new book Lean In. Her ideas of women failing themselves in the leadership game have sparked controversy and an entire Lean In movement. Meanwhile, I attended an event recently that reminded me my personal power isn’t just about leaning in and speaking up, it’s about standing tall.

Your mother always told you to stand up straight, but she may not have realized how much your posture and personal power are connected. In fact, body language counts for a whopping 55% of the impression you give others. What you say is only 7% and your tone accounts for 39%. After attending a mini-clinic at the Posture Academy by Eden Pilates, it’s clear I have some work to do. 

The Posture Academy is like a boot camp for your spine. The 4-week program is designed to improve posture through focus on breath, proper alignment and muscle strengthening. Let’s get real: most of us don’t pay attention to how we sit (for hours) at our computers, on the phone or in our cars. The Academy guides you to perfection over eight sessions where you’ll learn how to correct weaknesses and avoid chronic issues in the future. 

Afterwards I felt incredible, not just because I did my body a favor, but because I know the benefit of being able to command attention with my personal presence. 

The first session of The Posture Academy will begin Saturday, May 25, 2013. Cost includes 8 classes with Eden Haugland plus two 30-minute private posture analysis consultations. ($249 + HST) Eden Pilates | 901 Yonge Street | Suite 205 | 647-724-6594

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"The sooner I fall behind, the more time I have to catch up."

— Author Unknown

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I had a chance to meet Betsey Johnson last weekend in NY at the Fashion Group International’s awards dinner before her guest Q&A with Marylou Luther. Her energy and enthusiasm had not waned, even though the company had just begun liquidating its assets. Following is a list of Betsey quotes from the discussion.
"I can’t stop." "My favorite girl is the one who buys a dress w/one week’s salary." "I love mass production."
"Retail’s a bitch." "My changing point was freelancing for a company in Hong Kong. I took a job that earned me $60k that I invested in my company." "Cheap competition is my biggest challenge." "The web is mucho importante…even though I don’t understand it, I know it’s real communication with my customers." "I never studied fashion." "Look at me. I’m 70!""Lulu is Real Housewives … she’s working uptown. I’m working downtown."

I had a chance to meet Betsey Johnson last weekend in NY at the Fashion Group International’s awards dinner before her guest Q&A with Marylou Luther. Her energy and enthusiasm had not waned, even though the company had just begun liquidating its assets. Following is a list of Betsey quotes from the discussion.

"I can’t stop."

"My favorite girl is the one who buys a dress w/one week’s salary."

"I love mass production."

"Retail’s a bitch."

"My changing point was freelancing for a company in Hong Kong. I took a job that earned me $60k that I invested in my company."

"Cheap competition is my biggest challenge."

"The web is mucho importante…even though I don’t understand it, I know it’s real communication with my customers."

"I never studied fashion."

"Look at me. I’m 70!"

"Lulu is Real Housewives … she’s working uptown. I’m working downtown."

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Toronto Fashion Incubator celebrates 25 years and the culmination of the New Labels competition — the runway show. Fashion designers in Canada are lacking the access to financial means seen in other cultural arenas (music, film).
TFI is a legacy from a provincial government who saw the need to prop up the industry at a time when the Canadian fashion scene was hopping — FashionCares was born the same year, FashionTelevision was already in production two years. 
TFI’s goal is to give budding designers the cost-effective means and resources to build their business. Today, without the support from the private sector (a $25,000 cash donation from philanthropist Suzanne Rogers) there wouldn’t be much to give the winning designer beyond bragging rights (a.k.a. a fashion spread in Flare magazine).
For more on the New Labels competition, click here. And stay tuned to the F-list for the recap on Thursday’s celebration.

Toronto Fashion Incubator celebrates 25 years and the culmination of the New Labels competition — the runway show. Fashion designers in Canada are lacking the access to financial means seen in other cultural arenas (music, film).

TFI is a legacy from a provincial government who saw the need to prop up the industry at a time when the Canadian fashion scene was hopping — FashionCares was born the same year, FashionTelevision was already in production two years.

TFI’s goal is to give budding designers the cost-effective means and resources to build their business. Today, without the support from the private sector (a $25,000 cash donation from philanthropist Suzanne Rogers) there wouldn’t be much to give the winning designer beyond bragging rights (a.k.a. a fashion spread in Flare magazine).

For more on the New Labels competition, click here. And stay tuned to the F-list for the recap on Thursday’s celebration.

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Oh, I see, Old Spice is now for Fabio wannabes. All this video is missing is a seagull in the face. Who exactly is their target market? Quite a departure from Mr. Cool Isaiah Mustafa.

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"A realm of intimate personal power is developing - the power of individuals to conduct their own education, find their own inspiration, shape their own environment, and share the adventure with whoever is interested."

— Stuart Bond, 1970

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The most interesting part of this is not that it’s a two-week digital talent search for the Project Runway designer casting candidate, it’s that it’s from Look TV, the upcoming fashion and beauty channel in partnership with YouTube, Google and Full Picture, the co-creators and executive producers of Project Runway.

Interesting, as in, what else is up their sleeve?

From FashionablyMarketing.me | http://bit.ly/HR9AP0)

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My new website launched today! I’m excited and humbled at the same time, for I — someone who has worked in the digital space for over 16 years — have never had my own professional website. Silly, really. This means I can now use my Tumblr to share what it’s meant to share…small discoveries and tidbits of information I find compelling.

My new website launched today! I’m excited and humbled at the same time, for I — someone who has worked in the digital space for over 16 years — have never had my own professional website. Silly, really. This means I can now use my Tumblr to share what it’s meant to share…small discoveries and tidbits of information I find compelling.

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